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[02.21.2011 by Bridget Doyle]

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 » The Top 30 Albums of 2010 - Fashionably, fabulously late, our favorite music (and believe me, there was a LOT) of 2010, the year that some have called the best year for music ever. And only some of those fools work here. Plenty of usual suspects, lots of ties and a few surprises that I won't spoil, including our unexpected #1.
[12.24.2010 by The LAS Staff]

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[11.04.2010 by Cory Tendering]

Music Reviews

Screaming Females - Castle Talk
»Screaming Females
Castle Talk
Don Giovanni
Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross - The Social Network [Original Soundtrack]
»Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross
The Social Network [Original Soundtrack]
The Null Corporation
Deerhunter - Halcyon Digest
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Halcyon Digest
4AD
No Age - Everything in Between
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Everything in Between
Sub Pop
Robyn - Body Talk Pt. 1/ Body Talk Pt. 2
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Body Talk Pt. 1/ Body Talk Pt. 2
Konichiwa
The Walkmen - Lisbon
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Lisbon
Fat Possum
LOSTATSEA.NET > FEATURES >

May 30, 2008
RATING: 7.2/10
Grace is Gone, which was released on DVD earlier this week, secures its place as a moving entrant into the pantheon of Iraq War movies by avoiding schmaltz and melodrama while tackling a sensitive and emotional subject. The film is also immensely aided by John Cusack's performance as a broken father and husband who is forced by tragic circumstances to, for the first time, truly communicate with his two young daughters.

Cusack plays Stanley Phillips, a dumpy, bespectacled manager at a Home Depot-like construction supply store. His wife, Grace, who we only come into contact with through answering machine messages, is serving in the military. It turns out that this carries a great deal of shame for Stanley, as he was released from his own service because of an eye problem, and feels that he should be the one at war, not his wife. Stanley attends the occasional support group for spouses left behind while their partners are at war. While the predominantly female group discusses their last sexual encounters with their husbands before they were sent off, Stanley can only grunt that that information is private. He is closed off in so many ways, especially when it comes to his daughters, whom though he clearly loves, he is also mystified by.

One day, two uniformed officers knock on his door, and Stanley is given the news that Grace is, indeed, gone for good. He can't bring himself to tell his daughters, and instead decides to drive them to Florida to visit an amusement park, in a burst of manic joy that barely masks his grief. Cusack is wonderful in this role, especially when striding the line between forced happiness for what he perceives as the benefit of his kids and the harsh reality that his children's mother is dead. They make a stop at his mother's house, where his ne'er-do-well brother is sleeping on the couch. When the topic of whether the war is worth the price we pay comes up, Stanley won't allow himself or his daughters to even ponder the concept that maybe it is, in fact, not. Given his circumstances, the notion of a pointless war is just too painful. All the while, the viewer is acutely aware that the defining moment of revelation to his daughters must come, and when it does, it's touching and simple.



The reality of war is only presented in passing throughout the film, his daughters secretively turning on CNN for a moment here, Donald Rumsfeld's impotent defense of the reasons for going to war in the background, sight unseen, there. This sort of indirect, soft focus on Iraq is not dissimilar to the way in which most of us experience the war these days. It has become such a constant part of our reality and is taking place so far away, that our eyes scan the Internet or the evening news, perceiving but sometimes barely registering the toll it is taking. By using this tactic, Grace is Gone avoids outright political posturing, but paints a poignant picture of the price paid nonetheless. The choice of the road movie genre is a wise one here, allowing a physical and internal journey of discovery. Clint Eastwood's soft jazz score is effective, although sometimes overly sentimental, as Stanley repeatedly approaches the edge of telling his daughters that their mother is dead only to turn around at the brink and scurry back inside himself. Grace is Gone, much more so than Redacted [LAS feature] or Stop-Loss, is a movie about the Iraq War that truly touches upon the emotional devastation that is one of its costs.

TRAILER: www.youtube.com/watch?v=APqIvlCSLzM

SEE ALSO: www.graceisgone-themovie.com

--
Jonah Flicker
Jonah Flicker writes, lives, drinks, eats, and consumes music in New York, via Los Angeles. He once received a fortune in a fortune cookie that stated the following: "Soon, a visitor shall delight you." He's still waiting.

See other articles by Jonah Flicker.

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